Self Treatment Rarely Works (If Ever)

Self-treatment with amino acids is incredibly common; we receive emails and/or calls every week from people that are ‘trying’ amino acid therapy on their own, but not getting the results that they want/need. In addition to these instances, I’m going to suggest that the definition of self-treatment be expanded to include anyone that actively or passively does not follow their health care professionals recommended supplement protocol – either by “experimenting” with doses other than those recommended or by using “similar” products to those recommended. This approach rarely works, and the reasons are pretty straightforward. (more…)

Medications and Amino Acid Therapy

Many people are on medications that alter, mimic or in some way manipulate neurotransmitter levels in the body. These include stimulants, such as amphetamines (i.e., methamphetamine, “speed”, Adderall, Vyvanse, Dexedrine), ecstasy (MDMA), cocaine, and methylphenidate (i.e., Ritalin, Concerta); norepinephrine-reuptake inhibitors (i.e., Strattera, Edronax); norepinephrine-dopamine reuptake inhibitors (i.e., Wellbutrin, Zyman); selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (i.e., Paxil, Prozac, Zoloft, Celexa, Lexapro and Luvox); triptans (i.e., Imitrex, Maxalt, Amerge, Zomig); sleep aids (i.e., Ambien, Lunesta); barbiturates (i.e., phenobarbital, Fioricet); benzodiazepines (i.e., Xanax, Klonopin, Valium, Lorazepam); MAO inhibitors (i.e., Azilect, selegiline, Nardil, Morplan); COMT inhibitors (i.e., Comtan, Tasmar); and carbidopa/levodopa (i.e., Sinamet, Rytary, Stalevo). While these medications may exacerbate or cause neurotransmitter imbalances in the body, most can be safely used along with amino acid therapy to achieve optimal neurotransmitter function. (more…)

What Does a “Dopamine Fluctuation” Mean?

A person undertaking amino acid therapy will have periodic urine testing completed in order to determine if/how to adjust their amino acid dosing in order to optimize neurotransmitter function. Along the way, they may get a lab value for dopamine (or serotonin) that is much higher than is expected. This is often referred to as a “dopamine fluctuation”. We have provided a two part series discussing the dopamine fluctuation in more detail; here I wanted to provide a brief overview of what a dopamine fluctuation is and why it’s important to find and correct them as soon as possible. (more…)